The well-being of dogs is closely linked to their owners' knowledge of legislation


A recent study revealed that a lack of awareness of animals' needs and legal regulations can have negative consequences on their health and behaviour.


The well-being and behavior of dogs is closely linked to the care that their owners give them, as well as the knowledge they have about current legislation. A recent study revealed that a lack of awareness of animals' needs and legal regulations can have negative consequences for dogs' health and behavior.

he Stady, conducted through an online survey of owners in Chile, examined responsible ownership practices and the level of knowledge of animal welfare and pet ownership legislation among dog owners. 20% of dogs surveyed were found to be overweight or obese, and those who did not receive scraps of food were less likely to be obese. In addition, spayed female dogs have been found to be less likely to be obese than neutered male dogs.

Regarding aggressive behavior, it was noted that 24.6% of dog owners reported that their dogs showed aggression towards people, while 51.1% showed aggression towards other animals. Factors such as taking dogs to basic training classes, not walking them, and living on a farm increase the risk of aggressive behavior.

In addition, a lack of knowledge of current legislation increased the likelihood that dogs would not be microchipped, not registered, not have their vaccinations up to date, or not be spayed.

These findings underscore the need for an effective educational strategy that uses a multidisciplinary approach to improve pet ownership practices. Only by increasing awareness and understanding of dogs' needs and the legal responsibilities of owners can the well-being of pets be ensured.

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Tamara Tadic, Raul Alegría Moran, Sebastian Escobar Aguirre. Behavioral and health problems in dogs (Canis familiaris) associated with responsible ownership practices and awareness of legal regulations. Journal of Veterinary Behavior, Volume 71, 2024, Pages 1-8, ISSN 1558-7878, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2023.11.005.

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