Mets fires its general manager for harassing a journalist

Mets’ general manager, Jared Porter, was fired Tuesday after confessing to sending sexually explicit and inappropriate text messages and photos to a reporter in 2016 while working for the Chicago Cubs. According to ESPN, Porter sent dozens of text messages to the woman over the course of weeks, including a picture of a “naked erect penis.” She answered only to ask him to stop.

Nine hours after the exclusive announcement was published by ESPN, the new owner of Mets, Steve Cohen, posted a message on Twitter confirming Porter’s expulsion. “Jared Porter fired us this morning. In my first press conference I spoke about the importance of integrity and I mean that. There should be no tolerance for this kind of behavior.”

Half an hour later, Mets released a statement from Team Leader Sandy Alderson, in which he said the measure was immediately put into effect. “Jared’s actions, as reflected in the events that were revealed last night, did not meet Mets’ standards in professionalism and personal behavior,” Alderson said.

New York Porter, 41, hired last month. He took a four-year contract after spending the past four seasons with the Arizona Diamondbacks as Senior Vice President and Assistant General Manager. “I spoke directly with Jared Porter about the events in 2016 that we learned about tonight for the first time. Jared acknowledged his serious error in judgment, took responsibility for his behavior, expressed regret, and previously apologized for his actions.”

The woman, a foreign reporter who moved to the US to cover Major League Baseball, said she would prefer not to be identified. He met Porter in an elevator at Yankee Stadium in June 2016 and said they spoke briefly about international baseball and exchanged business cards.

Shortly thereafter she said, Porter started praising her for her looks, inviting her to meet him in various cities and asking her why she was ignoring him. After he sent her a lewd picture. The woman ignored more than 60 messages from Porter before sending the vulgar photo. He tried to avoid this in two of the major stadiums in the league, and Porter’s text messages ultimately contributed to his decision to ditch the press and return to his homeland.

Porter sent a letter of apology to the woman in 2016 after he blamed her for being “extremely indecent, extremely offensive and out of line. According to ESPN, Porter said he hadn’t sent any pictures of himself, but upon being informed the port said the exchanges show he sent selfies and pictures.” The other, he said, “The most obvious is not me. These are like a joke archive. “

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