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The video shows an Arizona State University police officer removing the protester's hijab during the arrest

This screenshot shows a campus police officer removing the hijab from the head of a female protester at Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona.

This screenshot shows a campus police officer removing the hijab from the head of a female protester at Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona. (Credit: Comprehensive Editing from A to Z)

Video taken over the weekend at Arizona State University shows a campus police officer removing the hijab from a female protester's head during her arrest.

The grainy video, obtained by Mass Liberation AZ and provided to CNN by attorney Zayed Al-Sayed, who represents the women, shows several ASU Police Department officers surrounding a woman with her hands behind her back while an officer removes her hijab.

People nearby can be heard shouting: “You're violating their privacy” and “Give it back to me.”

The officers then put the hoodie on the woman and a bystander shouted: “Can you wear a hoodie but not your hijab?” At one point, one of the officers blocked the woman from the view of those recording the video, while one of them shouted: “Let her go!”

A lawyer representing her and three other women who said this happened to them also demands accountability.

El-Sayed, who said the arrests took place early Saturday, did not identify the women, but said three of them were students at the university and all four were Phoenix-area residents. They face criminal charges of trespassing.

Al-Sayed said that when detained, the women explained the meaning of the hijab and “begged” to keep it, but she said they were told they had to take it off for safety reasons.

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“They never expected that an officer … sworn to protect and serve would violate their most basic right protected by the United States Constitution, which is the right to practice their religion.” “That's why they were injured,” Al-Sayed said.

Al-Sayed said that after they were arrested and taken by bus to prison, the women were not given their veils back.

About 15 hours later, when she was finally allowed to reach her clients, Al-Sayed said she was able to bring them a new hijabs.

The Arizona chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-AZ) condemned university police for the recorded incident and others like it, and called for a full investigation.

“This act represents a blatant violation of the religious freedoms of peaceful protesters. It is extremely sad for the women affected and ASU Police must thoroughly investigate this matter,” Azza Abu Seif, executive director of CAIR-AZ, said in an email to CNN. “.

“This matter is under review,” the university said in a statement to CNN. CNN has reached out to the Maricopa County Attorney's Office for comment.

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