Workers call for an investigation into pressure from David Cameron to save Greensel

This content was published on March 21, 2021 – 3:47 PM

London, March 21 (EFE). Britain’s Labor Party claims an investigation into alleged government pressure exerted by former Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron to obtain loans to Greensill Financial, before it declared bankruptcy at the start of the month, local media reported.

The Sunday Times reported today that Cameron, who since 2018 has advised an Anglo-Australian supply chain finance company and has stock options, sent multiple messages to Economy Minister Rishi Sunak in April 2020 and other members of the CEO of Tory to facilitate Access to credit for the company.

According to the newspaper, most of those messages were not responded to, and Sunak agreed with his environment’s opinion that Grinsel did not meet the requirements for access to the facilities introduced by the epidemic.

The Financial Times reported a few days ago that Greensill Capital, founded by Australian Lex Greensill in 2011, had been declared insolvent in a British court – which, among other things, would nullify Cameron’s buying options.

Labor Economic Party spokeswoman Anelise Dodds has called for an investigation into allegations that the 54-year-old former Conservative leader sent messages to Sonak’s personal phone in an alleged attempt to bypass official channels, British media reported.

“It is a matter of public money and the decision-making processes must be fully transparent and cannot be fixed,” the opposition deputy said.

Dodds noted that the conservative government already has “questions to answer” about how Lex Greensel, 44, approached ministers and officials, and even received a royal medal in 2017 for “services to the economy.”

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A Treasury spokesperson told the “Sunday Times” newspaper that Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government “maintains frequent contacts” with relevant parties to discuss economic responses to the Coronavirus.

He explained that the Greensel exchanges would analyze whether the supply chain finance companies could access some of the new loans, which were ultimately overlooked.

The fall of Greensill Capital, which is designated to make payments to suppliers at rates with discounts on the initial bill, has left other companies without funding, such as Britain’s GFG, for tycoon Sanjeev Gupta, who faces bankruptcy with the potential for losing thousands of jobs.

Cameron was prime minister of the United Kingdom between 2010 and 2016, when he resigned after Brexit won the referendum permanently in the European Union that he called on June 23 of that year, and since then, on the sidelines of writing the memoir, he has remained Relatively isolated from public life. EFE

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