The largest tree in the world covered with aluminum to prevent the fire from devouring it

General Sherman’s base, the largest tree in the world, was covered by a group of more than 300 firefighters with a thin layer of aluminum. Photo: AFP

In a dramatic image, General Sherman, the world’s largest tree, was covered with aluminum to prevent the fire from devouring it. Sequoia National Park, home to some of the largest and longest-lived organisms on the planet, is a natural area threatened by the ravages of the climate emergency.

As the colony, paradise, and cherry fires grow south of the park, giant mounds (the largest living creature in the world) face an unprecedented panorama.

Although it is one of the most fire-adapted trees (thanks to bark that is more than 50 cm thick) and sometimes small, controlled fires are useful for spreading their seeds contained in the cones, the harsh conditions of this summer’s California fires are consuming For dozens of specimens of species.

Soaring flames last weekend lit up the most famous image of last summer’s California fires: General Sherman’s Base, the world’s largest tree, covered by a group of more than 300 firefighters. With a thin layer of aluminum, in order to prevent the flames from devouring if they reach the area.

With a height of 2,000 tons and a length of 83.8 meters, General Sherman is the main attraction of Sequoia National Park, located 260 kilometers north of Los Angeles. This giant sequoia has a circumference of 31 meters at its base and a plaque indicates to its visitors that they encounter the organism with the highest biomass on the planet.

On September 19, all campgrounds in the area, including those in Secuoyas National Park and the adjacent Cañón de los Reyes Park, closed until September 30. Photo: Patrick Ty Fallon/AFP

In addition to General Sherman, firefighters have swept some of the largest and most famous trees in the area, including a group known as the Four Watchmen, which is just over 2,000 years old.

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On September 19, all campgrounds in the area, including those in Secuoyas National Park and the adjacent Cañón de los Reyes Park, closed until September 30.

According to the National Park Service, the fires known as the KNP Complex started on September 9 due to lightning in the area. So far, the fire, favored by the wind, has consumed 72 square kilometers. Although they are officially considered three different fires (heaven, colony, and cabin), the authorities say that heaven and colony have merged into a larger fire.

800 kilometers north, the situation is similar in Redwood National Park, home to Hyperion (the tallest tree in the world at 115.85 meters) and other redwoods of similar heights. Four fires continue to grow within a 60-kilometre radius that surrounds the world’s other giant tree sanctuary.

At the moment, the fire has consumed 72 square kilometers. Photo: Brian van der Brugg/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

As the colony, paradise, and cherry fires grow south of the park, giant mounds (the largest living creature in the world) face an unprecedented panorama. Photo: Seeb/Los Angeles Times

See also:

California temperatures soar as wildfires threaten Lake Tahoe

(taken from National Geographic in Spanish)

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