Sedec admits delays in loans from Banco de la Mujer in Tabasco – El Heraldo de Tabasco

Acknowledging that there has been a delay in the provision of credit support from Banco de la Mujer, the Minister of Economic Development and Competitiveness, Federico García Malitz, revealed that this year Tabasco has attracted more than $180 million in foreign direct investment.

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This is due to the investments of companies such as Hokchi Energy, as well as the fact that the main source of resources is the United Kingdom.

“Tabasco continues to lead in foreign direct investment, today there is $500 million in a pure hockey plant, although Hokchi Energy has invested nearly $1.3 billion between rigs and separation plants, which is a major advance for the state, this company said its commitment to the state,” he said. Important “.

Regarding the official generation of official employment, he said that the entity is the second country after Coahuila. “In July we were the second state with the highest job creation growth rate in the country, after Coahuila,” he said.

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He added that the goal for this year is to create 50,000 jobs and estimated that they were exceeded.

Regarding Banco de la Mujer, he noted that the Tabasco Business Fund (FET) meeting took place yesterday, and there are 95 credits already approved with credits of 50 thousand pesos per person, so that 6 million pesos have been delivered so far.

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“Of course they will all be authorized, there are 450 credits, and we are going a bit slow because the recipients take a while to load the information but we with about 100 of the 400 beneficiaries will be there,” he said. .

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He said that a total of up to 20 million pesos from the bag for this program will benefit artisans, Indigenous women, Internet cafes, convenience stores or small groceries, cheap kitchens and selling cosmetics in their homes.

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