Italian Names in the Flag: Don’t you know who we’re talking about?

Italy is one of the largest reservoirs of art in the world, and in turn it is the country with the largest number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. but, These are not the only contributions Italians have made to the world. In the field of natural sciences, there are also those who have played a decisive role either because of their discoveries or because they have found an explanation for things or events previously unknown to us. Let’s meet some of them.

Amedeo Avogadro: Apart from explaining the differences between different types of molecules with enviable accuracy, Avogadro proclaimed the law that bears his name today which states that “equal volumes of all gases, at the same temperature and pressure, have the same number of molecules.” In addition to Avogadro’s number, an asteroid and a meteorite are also named in his honor.

Camilo Golgi: This Italian physician and cytologist was the innovator of methods for staining cells based on silver chromate. His discovery was so important that in 1906 he and a Spaniard were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine. The Golgi apparatus, found in eukaryotic cells, a layer of the cerebellum, and a sensory receptor in muscles are named after him.

Marcelo Malpighi: This Bolognese anatomist was the first to observe living cells under a microscope. A few years later, he also showed that plant tissues also contain cells. Malpighi was also the first person to identify and describe the pulmonary circulation, which made it possible to explain how gas exchange takes place between arteries and veins.

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Enrico Fermi: Fermi won the Nobel Prize in Physics, and was the developer of the first nuclear reactor. Thanks to their contributions, modern fields of medicine, physics and chemistry use radioisotopes to conduct various studies and implement different analysis techniques.

“Public Domain: Enrico Fermi ca. 1940s (NARA)” by pingnews.com Marked with Public Domain Mark 1.0.

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